Welcome to my world - The world of Tish

Thursday, March 17, 2005

Token White Girl

Image hosted by Photobucket.comRemember the first season of A Different World? Marisa Tomei was the token white girl for an predominately black sit-com. For three years, I was her, the difference being I lived off campus.

I was known as White Tish, as opposed to what, I don't know. During my tenure, the Rodney King trial and riots occurred. Luckily, I didn't feel any repercussions from the racial divide.

One of my best friends commented on my anniversary post the other day . She calls me her token white friend, or maybe I call myself that. We joke that our children attend the others birthday parties to either add color or lighten up the room. Some people might find that offensive, but I see beauty in our humor. Friendship beyond the color barrier shouldn't be uncommon in this day and age, in fact, it should be the norm. If she make fun of my flat white woman butt and I can rag on her neverending hair accessories, doesn't that mean that we've buried some of the racial divide? Isn't that better than staring at each other from across the room out of fear of offending each other? Dee and I laugh at our differences all of the time. It's what makes our friendship unique.

When my son spent the night with one of his black friends, he came home with a one thing to ask me.

"Momma, did you know that 'C' is black ALL OVER?" His expression so full of wonder, I had to stifle a giggle. Kids don't see hate in color, only curiosity. His questions and comments are from innocence, not ignorance like the hate filled garbage the extremists spew to their children.

I know there will come a day when the divide will appear for my daughter as well as my son. It is my hope that my example and wide range of friendships soften these blows and help them through the difficult times. Until then, I am the token white girl and proud of it.

3 Comments:

  • It's funny to read this on somebody elses blog.

    We constantly deal with issues of mixing races; our son constantly questions why his hair is different than ours, for example.

    We also laugh about the ways that he is obviously different from us - he is slender and very graceful and strong.

    I hope I see a day where everyone enjoys the differences, rather than try and make them into something they aren't.

    By Blogger Silly Old Bear, at 11:11 PM  

  • I say enjoy the differences and celebrate them too. Until I was about 40 years old, I never knew that black people could sunburn and tandmore deeply. We had a deck built one summer that took 30 days. During the course of that the temps here were 95 to 105 everyday. The carpentry guys took their shirts off and by the end of the time they were almost as brown as the light-skinned black guy had been when they started. The black guy was at least 4 shades darker than he had been and it was a revelation to me.How stupid I was!

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 4:58 PM  

  • TISH,
    HEY GIRL! YOU KNOW YOU MY
    NIGGA !!!
    AND YES, WE CAN SAY THAT AND NOT HAVE A PROBLEM WITH IT,LIKE SOME WHO MAY BE OFF-ENDED BY THE "N" WORD.
    WELL, WHEN YOU ARE COMFORTABLE WITH WHO YOU ARE THINGS OF THIS NATURE TEND TO BOUNCE OFF.

    LOVE YA! DEE

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 9:38 AM  

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